Belgique Professional

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FivePointOh
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Belgique Professional

Postby FivePointOh » Fri Apr 11, 2003 11:27 pm

I never heard of these or have found a link to them. I do have a set of three, 3.5" paring, 4.5" utility, and 6" sandwich knives. The say they are made in Solingen Germany and are Ice Tempered. It also states ' X 50 CR MO V 15' whatever that means.

Anybody know anything about these knives?
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Vagrant
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Postby Vagrant » Sat Apr 12, 2003 7:03 am

Ice tempered probably is hype. Tempering is done at an elevated temperture, somewhere between 350 and 800 depending on the steel and it's intended use, [exceptions exist]. Tempering in ice would accomplish very little [and most of it bad]. An ice quench might be useful in some cases. Some people have experimented with a sub-zero [liquid nitrogen] quench between the hardening quench and tempering stages of the heat-treatment [and in some cases after tempering] and made great claims for the results. [On everything from knives to gun barrels]. Independent testing has produced mixed results, it shows some promise but is not yet widely accepted as a major breakthrough.

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BennytheBlade
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Postby BennytheBlade » Mon Apr 28, 2003 8:27 pm

is this the same thing that they do over at Texas Knife Supply? I saw that and saw the extra cash it costed, but wasnt sure about how big a difference it would make.
this is what they offer
We are offering Deep Cryogenic Tempering to blades along with our normal heat treating and tempering. This will add one day to the usual heat treating and tempering sequence. This service is also available for our factory finished blades. Deep Cryogenic Tempering is a one-time process that removes all of the retained austensite (large unstable particles of carbon carbide) from the steel and transforms it to martinsite. Edge holding properties are greatly enhanced by this process.

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Vagrant
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Postby Vagrant » Tue Apr 29, 2003 5:14 am

Ice is 32f [0c] cryogenic is done at minus 200 f [and lower] between "ice tempering and gryogenic tempering, the cryo wins hands down but the debate continues on how much good it really does. I'm neutral on this.

Stone Knife
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Postby Stone Knife » Sun Oct 12, 2003 11:02 am

Just saw a fascinating piece on the History Channel last night showing how Buck does their annealing and tempering.

The first stage was about 45 minutes around 1,800 degrees, then a 3-minute cool-down to about 200, after that, the blades were moved into a very cold place (looked like liquid-nitrogen-cold) and after awhile (sorry I did not write down the times), they were allowed to return to room temp; after that it was back into some ovens to 350 degrees for the final temper.

At no point did they go from blazing hot into ice or liquid nitrogen... the 'fastest' cool-down was the one that took 3 minutes.

The program was part of their "Hands-On-History" series.
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