How do I cook thick pieces

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tequiza
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Re: How do I cook thick pieces

Postby tequiza » Sat Jan 15, 2011 8:14 pm

As a matter of fact, yes they did :!:
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gramps
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Re: How do I cook thick pieces

Postby gramps » Sat Jan 15, 2011 8:20 pm

I married a Kraut...and what a GREAT cook she is. 40 + years now.
If I only knew!

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tequiza
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Re: How do I cook thick pieces

Postby tequiza » Sat Jan 15, 2011 9:10 pm

gramps wrote:I married a Kraut...and what a GREAT cook she is. 40 + years now.


Does she make sauerbraten with homemade potato pancakes gramps ? :D
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gramps
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Re: How do I cook thick pieces

Postby gramps » Sat Jan 15, 2011 9:17 pm

The homemade potato pancakes yes :) but not the sauerbraten :(
If I only knew!

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tequiza
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Re: How do I cook thick pieces

Postby tequiza » Sat Jan 15, 2011 9:22 pm

gramps wrote:The homemade potato pancakes yes :) but not the sauerbraten :(


Sorry to hear that, that was and still is one of my favorite meals.
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Viking45
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Re: How do I cook thick pieces

Postby Viking45 » Tue Jan 25, 2011 5:46 pm

tequiza wrote:
gramps wrote:The homemade potato pancakes yes :) but not the sauerbraten :(


Sorry to hear that, that was and still is one of my favorite meals.


This should make your mouth water :shock: I could eat this any time and never get tired of it.

http://allgaeuer-wirtschaften.de/waldha ... n-1000.jpg


The key to this recipe is to allow the roast to marinate for the full 3 days.

MARINADE INGREDIENTS:

* 1 cup dry red wine
* 1 cup red wine vinegar
* 2 cups cold water
* 1 medium onion, thinly sliced
* 1 Tablespoon black peppercorns, coarsely crushed
* 1 Tablespoon juniper berries, coarsely crushed
* 2 bay leaves
* 1 teaspoon salt
* 2-3 Tablespoons Sauerbraten Spice ( I have found them at Foods of All nations)
* 4 pounds boneless beef roast, preferably bottom round



ROASTING/ SAUCE INGREDIENTS:

* 3 Tablespoons butter
* 2 1/2 cups onions, diced
* 2 1/2 cups carrots, diced
* 1 1/4 cups celery, diced
* 2 Tablespoons flour
* 1/2 cup water
* 3/4 cup gingersnap cookies, crumbled

Combine all marinade ingredients, except the roast itself, in 2-3 quart saucepan. Bring to boil over high heat. Remove from heat and allow to cool to room temperature.
Place the beef in a deep, non-reactive (glass or ceramic) bowl or pot just large enough to hold it. Pour marinade over beef. The marinade should be at least halfway up the sides of the roast. If necessary add more wine. Cover tightly with foil or plastic wrap and refrigerate for 2-3 days, turning the meat in the marinade at least twice each day.
Remove meat from marinade and pat completely dry with paper towels. Strain the marinade through a fine sieve and reserve the liquid. Discard spices and onions.
In heavy, 5-quart dutch oven, heat the butter until bubbling stops. Add the meat and brown on all sides, turning frequently, so that it browns evenly without burning. Transfer to platter and set aside.
For roasting, add the onions, carrots, and celery to the same pan you cooked the meat in. Cook over moderate heat until soft and light brown (5-8 minutes). Sprinkle 2 Tablespoons of flour over the vegetables and cook, stirring constantly, 2-3 minutes longer or until the flour begins to color. Pour in 2 cups of the reserved marinade and 1/2 cup of water and bring to boil over high heat. Return the meat to the pot, cover tightly, and simmer over low heat for 2 hours, or until the meat shows no resistance when pierced with the tip of a sharp knife. Alternatively, bake in 350 degree oven for 2 hours.
Transfer the roast to a heated platter and cover with foil to keep warm while sauce is made.
Pour the liquid left in the pot into a large measuring cup and skim fat from surface. You will need at least 2 1/2 cups for the sauce. If additional liquid is needed, add some of the reserved marinade.
Combine the liquid and the gingersnap crumbs in a saucepan and cook over moderate heat, stirring frequently for approx. 10 minutes, allowing the cookie crumbs to dissolve completely and thicken the sauce to the desired consistency. Depending upon the amount of liquid, you may need to add additional cookie crumbs.
Strain the sauce through a fine sieve, pressing down hard with wooden spoon to force as much of the vegetables and crumbs through as possible. Return the sauce to the pan, adjust seasoning and allow to simmer over low heat until ready to serve.
Slice the roast, pour some sauce over slices on platter and pass remaining sauce separately.

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dark2023
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Re: How do I cook thick pieces

Postby dark2023 » Tue Jan 25, 2011 5:51 pm

Personally I like my SPAM pan fried


Spam spam eggs and spam
or
eggs spam bacon spam and spam
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Re: How do I cook thick pieces

Postby JerrBear » Tue Jan 25, 2011 6:09 pm

Mr. Viking,

I'm sure your recipe turns out mos' awesomeness! But, alas, it requires too many ingredients, appears to be time-consuming anna whole lotta work - Think I'll just go to ARBY'S... :P HO! HO! :P
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Viking45
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Re: How do I cook thick pieces

Postby Viking45 » Tue Jan 25, 2011 6:52 pm

JerrBear wrote:Mr. Viking,

I'm sure your recipe turns out mos' awesomeness! But, alas, it requires too many ingredients, appears to be time-consuming anna whole lotta work - Think I'll just go to ARBY'S... :P HO! HO! :P


It's a recipe I found on the i-net but almost exactly like the one I have used before.
I am the kind of person that likes to spend some time in the kitchen.
There are a few things I make pretty good,just some basic stuff but I do pretty well on Chicken Cordon Bleu,Chicken Kiev,pot roast(don't laugh,I have tasted some messed up roast)pork tenderloin,brisket (like to learn how to smoke it) and a few others.
Czech goulash is another darn good meal. Haven't tried Polish goulash but hear it's good too.

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jmack1944
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Re: How do I cook thick pieces

Postby jmack1944 » Tue Jan 25, 2011 9:41 pm

Viking45 wrote:
JerrBear wrote:Mr. Viking,

I'm sure your recipe turns out mos' awesomeness! But, alas, it requires too many ingredients, appears to be time-consuming anna whole lotta work - Think I'll just go to ARBY'S... :P HO! HO! :P


It's a recipe I found on the i-net but almost exactly like the one I have used before.
I am the kind of person that likes to spend some time in the kitchen.
There are a few things I make pretty good,just some basic stuff but I do pretty well on Chicken Cordon Bleu,Chicken Kiev,pot roast(don't laugh,I have tasted some messed up roast)pork tenderloin,brisket (like to learn how to smoke it) and a few others.
Czech goulash is another darn good meal. Haven't tried Polish goulash but hear it's good too.


Jeez Viking it's 4:37 pm and I haven't had lunch and your list of culinary delights is causing me to drool all over my keyboard. What time are you serving dinner? BTW ( can't resist ) I've tried smoking brisket too but just can't get it to light. Not even with my best Zippo. 8)
And I'm not laughing about the pot roast. One of my faves.

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dark2023
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Re: How do I cook thick pieces

Postby dark2023 » Tue Jan 25, 2011 10:34 pm

It's a recipe I found on the i-net but almost exactly like the one I have used before.
I am the kind of person that likes to spend some time in the kitchen.
There are a few things I make pretty good,just some basic stuff but I do pretty well on Chicken Cordon Bleu,Chicken Kiev,pot roast(don't laugh,I have tasted some messed up roast)pork tenderloin,brisket (like to learn how to smoke it) and a few others.
Czech goulash is another darn good meal. Haven't tried Polish goulash but hear it's good too.


My Finace has this amazing dish she often serves called Brazen Bird. It's a heavenly piece of chicken breast (which I don't usually like) spiced and cooked to perfection, and then served over wild rice with some kind of homemade gravy. It's divine.

My father used to be a great cook, back when I lived with him (a few years back) he loved to make stuff using sherry. He could cook the hell out of steak, but he was good with most anything, 'cept rice (he always left it a bit too tough on the inside).
This is the magic incantation congress uses to constantly violate the 10th Amendment - "...the manufacture, sale, transportation, distribution, possession, or introduction into interstate commerce of such shall be prohibited"

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Viking45
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Re: How do I cook thick pieces

Postby Viking45 » Tue Jan 25, 2011 10:51 pm

I made myself hungry talking about that stuff. I'm far from a chef but do enjoy cooking. There are few things I make pretty well but all are from recipes I have acquired through the years none of them are my own.
Most of these things are easy just follow the recipe exactly and anyone could do it.
Of course I have made those chicken and roast dishes so much I can make them blind folded.

As for smoking a brisket,it may be best to use an acetylene torch :lol:

Some day I am going to attempt ribs on the grill,some say to boil them first some say never boil them.
I personally don't like the idea of boiling them. Very low heat and let them cook for a long time is all I know.
Then the question is- Rub or sauce? I like both.

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jmack1944
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Re: How do I cook thick pieces

Postby jmack1944 » Tue Jan 25, 2011 11:07 pm

Viking I've done the ribs both ways and I prefer non-boiling. Slow cook is best IMO. I like to chew the meat off the bone rather than have it fall off (boiling method). And sauce for me as opposed to rub.

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tequiza
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Re: How do I cook thick pieces

Postby tequiza » Tue Jan 25, 2011 11:52 pm

Viking45 wrote:
tequiza wrote:
gramps wrote:The homemade potato pancakes yes :) but not the sauerbraten :(


Sorry to hear that, that was and still is one of my favorite meals.


This should make your mouth water :shock: I could eat this any time and never get tired of it.

http://allgaeuer-wirtschaften.de/waldha ... n-1000.jpg


The key to this recipe is to allow the roast to marinate for the full 3 days.

MARINADE INGREDIENTS:

* 1 cup dry red wine
* 1 cup red wine vinegar
* 2 cups cold water
* 1 medium onion, thinly sliced
* 1 Tablespoon black peppercorns, coarsely crushed
* 1 Tablespoon juniper berries, coarsely crushed
* 2 bay leaves
* 1 teaspoon salt
* 2-3 Tablespoons Sauerbraten Spice ( I have found them at Foods of All nations)
* 4 pounds boneless beef roast, preferably bottom round



ROASTING/ SAUCE INGREDIENTS:

* 3 Tablespoons butter
* 2 1/2 cups onions, diced
* 2 1/2 cups carrots, diced
* 1 1/4 cups celery, diced
* 2 Tablespoons flour
* 1/2 cup water
* 3/4 cup gingersnap cookies, crumbled

Combine all marinade ingredients, except the roast itself, in 2-3 quart saucepan. Bring to boil over high heat. Remove from heat and allow to cool to room temperature.
Place the beef in a deep, non-reactive (glass or ceramic) bowl or pot just large enough to hold it. Pour marinade over beef. The marinade should be at least halfway up the sides of the roast. If necessary add more wine. Cover tightly with foil or plastic wrap and refrigerate for 2-3 days, turning the meat in the marinade at least twice each day.
Remove meat from marinade and pat completely dry with paper towels. Strain the marinade through a fine sieve and reserve the liquid. Discard spices and onions.
In heavy, 5-quart dutch oven, heat the butter until bubbling stops. Add the meat and brown on all sides, turning frequently, so that it browns evenly without burning. Transfer to platter and set aside.
For roasting, add the onions, carrots, and celery to the same pan you cooked the meat in. Cook over moderate heat until soft and light brown (5-8 minutes). Sprinkle 2 Tablespoons of flour over the vegetables and cook, stirring constantly, 2-3 minutes longer or until the flour begins to color. Pour in 2 cups of the reserved marinade and 1/2 cup of water and bring to boil over high heat. Return the meat to the pot, cover tightly, and simmer over low heat for 2 hours, or until the meat shows no resistance when pierced with the tip of a sharp knife. Alternatively, bake in 350 degree oven for 2 hours.
Transfer the roast to a heated platter and cover with foil to keep warm while sauce is made.
Pour the liquid left in the pot into a large measuring cup and skim fat from surface. You will need at least 2 1/2 cups for the sauce. If additional liquid is needed, add some of the reserved marinade.
Combine the liquid and the gingersnap crumbs in a saucepan and cook over moderate heat, stirring frequently for approx. 10 minutes, allowing the cookie crumbs to dissolve completely and thicken the sauce to the desired consistency. Depending upon the amount of liquid, you may need to add additional cookie crumbs.
Strain the sauce through a fine sieve, pressing down hard with wooden spoon to force as much of the vegetables and crumbs through as possible. Return the sauce to the pan, adjust seasoning and allow to simmer over low heat until ready to serve.
Slice the roast, pour some sauce over slices on platter and pass remaining sauce separately.

That's pretty much the way my Mother would make it Dave, I remember her putting the meat in a crock and covering it with a cheesecloth then letting it set in a cool dark place for 3 days, she would make the gravy from the drippings of the roast and make the potato pancakes from scratch, making me hungry just thinking about it :!: :D
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JerrBear
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Re: How do I cook thick pieces

Postby JerrBear » Wed Jan 26, 2011 5:57 am

dark2023 wrote:My father used to be a great cook, back when I lived with him (a few years back) he loved to make stuff using sherry. He could cook the hell out of steak, but he was good with most anything, 'cept rice (he always left it a bit too tough on the inside).

Cooking rice is tricky (adlest for me)... Either under-cooked (crunchy) or over-cooked (soggy mess)... I've cooked it onna stovetop and even bought a microwave rice cooker - I still manage to mess it upness every jimpin' time!
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