False button?

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natcherly
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Re: False button?

Postby natcherly » Tue Feb 05, 2019 8:19 am

Bill DeShivs wrote:I think the 1960s knives are what they are- the closest thing to switchblades you could get. At some point, they may be collectible.

I sure hope so. I've got two 13" false buttons, both of which are built like a proverbial brick s#|+ house. They are as massive and as well made as the 13" golden age pre-ban switches from Maniago.

The only spring to break is the one under the button :lol:

Tom19176
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Re: False button?

Postby Tom19176 » Tue Feb 05, 2019 10:38 am

I will say they are now collectible !! The false button models command fairly high prices over normal lock backs. Natcherly can you post a picture of yours? I like them!! FYI the lock placement on these is the standard location for these. Hump Backs had the lock release midway on the back of the knife not the bottom like the common lock backs....

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portlandmike
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Re: False button?

Postby portlandmike » Tue Feb 05, 2019 2:13 pm

Bill DeShivs wrote:It's done, except for a little laser welding on the sear hole. Unfortunately the laser welder is down for repairs. As soon as it's back up or replaced, I'll finish it up.

Sounds good... Thank you Bill

Mike

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Re: False button?

Postby orangeboy » Tue Feb 05, 2019 2:33 pm

The false button models were designed in the late 1950s and patented by Elso Mauro (the Mauro Mario group). I’m surprised the experts here didn’t know but I suppose that’s par for the course. :lol:

This model here is a little later because it also employs the lockback mechanism...patented in 1961.
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Bill DeShivs
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Re: False button?

Postby Bill DeShivs » Tue Feb 05, 2019 6:08 pm

A little less smart-ass, ok Orangboy?
Otherwise, thank you for your input.
I believe the lockback patent was issued to Angelo Campolin, Sr. I'm sure Orangboy will correct me if I'm wrong.
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Re: False button?

Postby orangeboy » Tue Feb 05, 2019 7:02 pm

Bill DeShivs wrote:A little less smart-ass, ok Orangboy?
Otherwise, thank you for your input.
I believe the lockback patent was issued to Angelo Campolin, Sr. I'm sure Orangboy will correct me if I'm wrong.


No ones name were ever mentioned at all. And if it’s true that the lockback was patented by Angelo Campolin Sr...due credit should be given to whomeever found out that info. When people parrot info and never cite the source it’s pretty sad.

Tim Zinser (aka Ragtime Red) stole 95% of the graphics he used for Switchblades of Italy from two different books made in Italy which were copyrighted against any unauthorized use and he never once gave credit in Switchblades of Italy nor ever mentioned those two books ever. Pretty sad...
Last edited by orangeboy on Tue Feb 05, 2019 7:10 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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natcherly
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Re: False button?

Postby natcherly » Tue Feb 05, 2019 7:07 pm

Tom19176 wrote:I will say they are now collectible !! The false button models command fairly high prices over normal lock backs. Natcherly can you post a picture of yours? I like them!!


OK here are some pictures as you requested!
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20190205_102506_resized.jpg (519.68 KiB) Viewed 240 times

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Re: False button?

Postby john » Tue Feb 05, 2019 7:24 pm

If you have the extra cash, certainly, hire one of the pros and have it converted into an auto. However, you may want to consider doing it yourself. With the advice and guidance of our professionals on this website you should be able to get through it.
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portlandmike
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Re: False button?

Postby portlandmike » Tue Feb 05, 2019 8:04 pm

Those are gorgeous and in such great shape... so strange to see the locking tab without a hole. Thanks for sharing those !

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Re: False button?

Postby sammy the blade » Tue Feb 05, 2019 9:48 pm

I didn't notice that, how do they lock up then?

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natcherly
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Re: False button?

Postby natcherly » Tue Feb 05, 2019 11:09 pm

sammy the blade wrote:I didn't notice that, how do they lock up then?

These do not have locking pins, thus there are no holes in the lock tab. The blades do not "lock" open as you would find in other old and new stilettos. Only the friction of the cut out part of the blade against the lock tab keeps these open. Not very positive or secure. Why they did not use the lock pin & tab method is a mystery to me. If I were to use one of these for the purpose intended, i.e. stabbing something, I would not feel comfortable. I would worry that in all the excitement, the blade would close against my fingers. Ouch! :cry:

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Re: False button?

Postby orangeboy » Tue Feb 05, 2019 11:15 pm

natcherly wrote:
sammy the blade wrote:I didn't notice that, how do they lock up then?

These do not have locking pins, thus there are no holes in the lock tab. The blades do not "lock" open as you would find in other old and new stilettos. Only the friction of the cut out part of the blade against the lock tab keeps these open. Not very positive or secure. Why they did not use the lock pin & tab method is a mystery to me. If I were to use one of these for the purpose intended, i.e. stabbing something, I would not feel comfortable. I would worry that in all the excitement, the blade would close against my fingers. Ouch! :cry:



They didn’t use the lock pin because that was a Mauro Mario patent as well.
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natcherly
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Re: False button?

Postby natcherly » Wed Feb 06, 2019 12:09 am

orangeboy wrote:
natcherly wrote:
sammy the blade wrote:I didn't notice that, how do they lock up then?

These do not have locking pins, thus there are no holes in the lock tab. The blades do not "lock" open as you would find in other old and new stilettos. Only the friction of the cut out part of the blade against the lock tab keeps these open. Not very positive or secure. Why they did not use the lock pin & tab method is a mystery to me. If I were to use one of these for the purpose intended, i.e. stabbing something, I would not feel comfortable. I would worry that in all the excitement, the blade would close against my fingers. Ouch! :cry:

They didn’t use the lock pin because that was a Mauro Mario patent as well.

How could Mauro Mario obtain a patent for something like a lock pin that had been in use for many years before Mauro Mario even existed?

orangeboy
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Re: False button?

Postby orangeboy » Wed Feb 06, 2019 12:17 am

natcherly wrote:
orangeboy wrote:
natcherly wrote:These do not have locking pins, thus there are no holes in the lock tab. The blades do not "lock" open as you would find in other old and new stilettos. Only the friction of the cut out part of the blade against the lock tab keeps these open. Not very positive or secure. Why they did not use the lock pin & tab method is a mystery to me. If I were to use one of these for the purpose intended, i.e. stabbing something, I would not feel comfortable. I would worry that in all the excitement, the blade would close against my fingers. Ouch! :cry:

They didn’t use the lock pin because that was a Mauro Mario patent as well.

How could Mauro Mario obtain a patent for something like a lock pin that had been in use for many years before Mauro Mario even existed?


You tell me? Possibly it was easy to get a utility patent for a new design in Italy not used before on a stiletto?
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Bill DeShivs
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Re: False button?

Postby Bill DeShivs » Wed Feb 06, 2019 1:03 am

You do realize there were two co-authors of SOI? Why are you just accusing Tim? Because he's dead? Accusing people of theft is pretty serious.
Whether that's true or not, generally a European copyright is not enforceable outside of Europe.
Do you disseminate any information from those two "secret" books?
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Factory authorized repairs for:
Latama, Mauro Mario, LePre, Colonial, Kabar, Flylock, Schrade Cut Co., Presto, Press Button, Hubertus, Grafrath, Kuno Ritter knives.


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